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20121104
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
have less than two months to steer clear of the fiscacliff-- the combination of tax hikes and government spending cuts scheduled to take affect in january. our market monitor this week says plan now for higher taxes soon, and higher interest rates eventually. duncan richardson is chief investment officer at eaton vance management. he joins us from that firm in boston. duncan, i take it you're a pessimist in regards to avoiding the fiscal cliff that we're going to go over? >> not really a pessimist. i think the fiscal cliff is going to be more of a fiscal slope, but there will be a tax element to it. i think because we're starting at such a low level of tax rates, we're very likely to have higher taxes either immediately with the expiration of the payroll tax and potentially on capital gains and dividends in 2013 and beyond. >> tom: how should invests approach that, invest on what tax rates may be next year? >> not really. but there are great costs to be avoided by lessening the tax drag on your investment. positioning your portfolio and making sure you're in sthooks can ou
into buyers. >> tom: then, from tax hikes to corporate earnings worries,o tonight's "market monitor" guest says investors are facing a cliff of concern. robert stovall of wood asset manament joins us. >> susie: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."!me >> tom: the u.s. economy actually sped up in the third quarter, surprising economists and maybe you too. thanks to a pick-up in spending by conumers, the federal government and the housing c sector, the gross domestic product grew at a 2% annual rate in july through september. that 2% pace was stronger than expected and much better than what the economy experienced in the second quarter. suzanne pratt takes a closer look at the data and what it suggests about the economy the final months of this year. >> reporter: an economy growing at a 2% annual rate is hardly anything to celebrate. sure it could've been worse. but, clearly at three-years post great recessi , it should be a lot better., experts call it a side-ways economy, one that is unabltona create enough jobs to bring down the nation's stubborn unemployment rate. but, people on the streets
on a shopping spree in the third quarter, shrugging off the threat of higher taxes next year. businesses, on the other hand, pulled back sharply on their spending, the first cutback in business investment in more than a year. and that has some economists concerned. >> business spending in particular was sort of alarmingly soft. and, that's where we're starting to see the effects of the fiscal cliff and the uncertainty associated with it. >> reporter: it also suggests that the economy will slow in the final quarter of this year, as companies continue to postpone purchases of everything from software to new machinery. >> i think in the current quarter we could see growth that's a little bit softer, a little bit below 2%, primarily because it looks like business investment could be even weaker. and, this is based on orders for capital equipment. >> reporter: as for how the u.s. economy will fare in the first part of next year, that's really anyone's guess. estimates for q1 g.d.p. range from negative to positive numbers, and that uncertainty is due to the fiscal cliff. suzanne pratt, "n.b.r.
to extend expiring tax cuts and ease looming spending cuts; or they can jump off the so-called fiscal cliff and see if the economy follows. darren gersh, nbr, washington. >> tom: retail sales moved higher in october as retailers closed their books on the month before sandy rushed ashore. macy's surprised with a better than expected 4% sales gains; kohl's and target also fared well. warehouse store costco was up 5%, while nordstrom was the standout. the high-end retailer posting a near 10% sales gain. >> susie: and auto sales moved higher in october, despite hurricane sandy crimping sales in the final days of the month. sales at g.m. rose almost 5% on strength in its cadillac and buick brands. at ford, sales barely budged, up just four tenths of a percent. the auto maker believes the massive storm cost the industry as many as 25,000 sales in the last three days of the month. chrysler was up 10%, led by its ram pickup truck. toyota's sales were up 16%, while honda gained about half that. also from ford today, some management news that looks like a succession plan. mark fields was tapped to be
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)